Get e-book Heyday

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Heyday file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Heyday book. Happy reading Heyday Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Heyday at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Heyday Pocket Guide.

View all 3 comments. Jan 01, Steve Tannuzzo rated it liked it. This book was too long. I love 19th-century historical fiction and there's some great stuff here as the group of friends travel from Paris to New York and eventually California during the Gold Rush. Unbeknownst to them, a vengeful killer is tracking them on their cross-country journey. The year is the star here. There was so much happening during that time. In addition to the Gold Rush, there were technological and industrial advances, like photography, the telegraph, and railroads. The whol This book was too long.

Author Kurt Andersen does an excellent job working these real-life events into his fiction. But I didn't feel the story and characters were deserving of a page novel. Heyday is a book that is just too long to fully enjoy. At pages, it might have been a five-star read. Very good, but far from great.

Dec 17, AuthorsOnTourLive! It is also an affecting story of four people passionately chasing their American dreams at a time when America herself was still being dreamed up-an enthralling, old-fashioned yarn interwoven with a bracing A fresh, impeccable portrait of an era startlingly reminiscent of our own times, Heyday is by turns tragic and funny and sublime, filled with bona fide heroes and lost souls, visionaries Walt Whitman, Charles Darwin, Alexis de Tocqueville and monsters, expanding horizons and narrow escapes.

It is also an affecting story of four people passionately chasing their American dreams at a time when America herself was still being dreamed up-an enthralling, old-fashioned yarn interwoven with a bracingly modern novel of ideas. Jun 10, Tuck rated it liked it Shelves: europa , music-and-others , pre-wwi , sailing-and-fighting , this-ain-t-a-louis-lamour-type-of-p , natural-history , western-rural-with-tractors-horse.

Oct 04, Katharine rated it it was amazing. I would even go so far as to say it was one of the best I've read this year. I am not usually a historical fiction fan. I would have never picked this book up based on a jacket or a blurb. I did pick it up because I am systematically reading through my public library alphabetically. This book had the good fortune of being written by an author whose last name began with A. Now, on to the book. This is the saga of four young Americans, three men and one woman, Oh. This is the saga of four young Americans, three men and one woman, Ben, Duff, Skags and Polly, in who symbolize the verve, drive and ingenuity of a fledgling country.

As individuals, they are victims of their own economic circumstances yet, none of them choose to remain in what they see as economic bondage. They come together to talk a great deal about philosophies and new ideas that are literally and figuratively exploding all around the globe and they decide what to do about it. They each say that they are noble, but they're all selfish like the rest of us, hungry for adventure, invention, revenge, security and Utopia.

The author did a fabulous job, in my opinion of drawing such clear characters. I wanted them all to succeed, especially Ben. I loved the way that he, as an English immigrant was enraptured by America and was driven to become one. I LOVED the language and how the author was so meticulous in making sure that the reader knew that phrases were being invented just as America was, words like "megalopolis" and "ok" were fascinating. I loved the way that the author had each of the characters rub shoulders sometimes literally with true innovators of that time who didn't know yet that they would all change history.

The author was also very honest in his depiction of the darker sides of urban life. My eyes were opened and I felt like I had experienced history in a far more authentic way than I ever had before. I did think that the connection of Ben with Frederick Engels and Skaggs' attempt at an apology to Abraham Lincoln were not needed. But I didn't roll my eyes because there was a tone of the fantastic to this story -- and I saw it in the beginning when Ben was in Paris fighting off Revolutionaries with a stuffed penguin -- that I was completely drawn to.

And the return of Ashby, while far-fetched, was PERFECT What this historical fiction has, that I have rarely seen in other books of this genre, was a spirit of FUN and adventure and lightheartedness and comical coincidences, which some might say were cheap shots by the author. I don't. I say that as a whole, it worked. If there was a weakness in the book, I would say that the mundane life that Ben and Polly had in San Francisco would be it. Perhaps that also is the point.

We can't have adventures all of the time, even that young adult nation in the a story -- the United States -- has to grow up and settle down and be mature at some point. There are some books that I like and I say, "I could have written that. In awe. There's no way I could ever write something so detailed, so full of fun, so complex and leave me with such an intense book hangover afterward. Jul 02, Marley rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: highly.

It could have gone on. The book takes place in that most revolutionary year, , when the great houses of Europe shook and trembled, and in some cases fell--at least for awhile. And in the US gold was discovered. The revolutionary year frames the narrative that takes our heroes from Paris to New York to the Utopian communes of the midwest to San Fransisco and the gold fields--and eventually, their authentic selves.

The strongest characters to me were Timothy Skaggs, daguerreotypist, reporter, womanizer, sometime drunk who turns dreamer stargazer, and philosopher, and Duff Lucking. Polly Lucking, Duff's actressm artustm, avocational prostitute, free thinking sister, and Benjamin Knowles her suitor and second son of a neo-rich British manufacturer and money-grubber round-out the quartet..

And then there is Drumont, who unbeknowst to Knowles, blames him for the death of his brothe in the streets of revolutionary Paris and goes miles to avenge that death. Some reviewers have complained that the main characters did not seem "real" or at least out of place suggesting the book is a revisionist "history.

They also complain oddly that there are too many historical details that distract.

As an historian with an interest in Republican America, I think the characters were as real as any novelist's creation can be. The historical details were fascinating, not distracting, and made the story seem more real: Blue Mass, whorehosue protocol, fire fighting technology, or lack thereof, Five Points, the yellow press, fashion and interesting midth century vocabhularly. Sure there are contrivances, but history and fiction are both contrived.

The other star of Heydey is technology and how quickly the new becomes old. One night Skaggs tells Ben, "yes even if I don't wish actually to return to the past, I am vexed as the very recent past disappears before my blinkard's eyes. The pull-down-and-build-over again spirit saddens me. One day I counted the demolitions of three-three buildings on Broadway I do not gainsay real progress, he concluded, But I mourn all the victims of progress.

This theme continues throughout Heyday, especially once they hit California and set up their gold camp, Ashbyville, where within little time the four become an anachronism. For some the end of the journey is glad. For others tragic. Duff Lucking's theory of destruction and creation , the cycle of life" permeates the book and serves as a metaphor not only for Skaggs, Knowles, and the Luckiing, but America itself.

Once the dream is caught, it's gone. Feb 15, Marjorie Hakala rated it liked it. I wanted to read something really good, and I'd found this book on a best-of list. I kinda wish I remembered which list it was, so that I could proceed to mistrust that critic's judgment. The writing here isn't bad , and the characters are plausible. I was really into things for a one or two hundred pages. But there's not a whole lot that's remarkably good about it. I think the writing just needed to be better to justify the scale of this book. Characters keep using words that sound perfectl I wanted to read something really good, and I'd found this book on a best-of list.

Characters keep using words that sound perfectly ordinary to twenty-first century readers--"materialism," "star" as a person, etc. This was entertaining exactly once. By the time I was in the s of the pages and somebody pointlessly remarked, "Output is a strange word. I have never heard it," I was very, very close to putting the book down.

Barr-Co. Candles & Body Care

But I'd committed to it thus far, of course, so I finished it, and it kept doing its thing up until the eight hundred whateverth page where it finally decided to stop. There's also the way some dialogue takes place in French or Spanish, and then the author translates everything that was just said. Oh, and every time something in the plot parallels something else in the plot, that's pointed out too. It's just graceless.

Three stars for effort, for the interesting facts about 19th-century prostitution, and for being just good enough that I convinced myself I liked it for a while, but I don't especially recommend it. Mar 05, Carly Thompson rated it liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , arrt , , chunkster. Lord this was a long book that definitely felt like a long book. In many ways this book reminded me of a sprawling Victorian novel like Dickens wrote--lots of characters, lots of detail, humor, romance, and the villain is defeated in the end. In other ways this was clearly a 21st Century novel--more gore, sex, and free thinking attitudes.

I liked the book but reading it often felt like a chore. I agree with other reviewers that sometimes the wealth of historical detail overwhelms the plot. This is characterized as literary historical fiction but it felt more like a rowdy epic more concerned with plot and fun than strong characterization and thematic resonance. There was a strong sense of place particularly New York City but the characters were necessarily all that appealing.

Andersen wrote his male characters - Ben, Skaggs, and Duff with more verve and personality than his main female character, Polly who despite falling into the cliched category of semi-reformed prostitute seemed a rather flat, bland character. Better for the sense of place and historical facts than the characters. I feel this book would appeal to male readers more than female readers.

Gore Vidal Mar 30, Topher rated it it was ok Shelves: literature. I don't know how this book ended up on my 'to read' list of books. From the dust jacket, when I picked it up, I thought maybe it was going to be a western - "all four set out on a transcontinental race west" would tend to lead to that idea. It's not that people are getting killed left, right, and center; just that there's a bit more of that kind of thing than I like in my books.

But then again, explicitly not sugar-coating things is probably intentional. Poor sheltered me. Very much enjoyed. Jan 22, Bibliophile rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction , , american-history , 19th-century , historical-fiction. A good third or so of the novel is set in New York in , and that was my favorite part, because it was fascinating to read about what New York was like at that period.

The main characters are: Polly Lucking, sometime actress and prostitute; her brother Duff Lucking, a veteran of the Mexican War who carries a dark secret around with him; Timothy Skaggs, muckraking journalist; and Ben Knowles, a wealthy young Englishman who falls in love with the idea of America as embodied in the writings of his cousin by marriage Alexis de Tocqueville and abandons his future in England in order to live his dream.

There are a whole host of minor characters, including a vengeful French policeman and guest appearances by Walt Whitman, Charles Darwin, Friedrich Engels and, of course, Tocqueville. The plot was fairly simple and straightforward, and involved multiple pursuits of true love and of vengeance! I think the real strenght of the novel lies in its vivid portrayal of the young American republic in all its contradictory impulses.

View all 3 comments. Jan 01, Steve Tannuzzo rated it liked it. This book was too long. I love 19th-century historical fiction and there's some great stuff here as the group of friends travel from Paris to New York and eventually California during the Gold Rush. Unbeknownst to them, a vengeful killer is tracking them on their cross-country journey. The year is the star here. There was so much happening during that time. In addition to the Gold Rush, there were technological and industrial advances, like photography, the telegraph, and railroads.

The whol This book was too long. Author Kurt Andersen does an excellent job working these real-life events into his fiction. But I didn't feel the story and characters were deserving of a page novel. Heyday is a book that is just too long to fully enjoy. At pages, it might have been a five-star read. Very good, but far from great.

Dec 17, AuthorsOnTourLive! It is also an affecting story of four people passionately chasing their American dreams at a time when America herself was still being dreamed up-an enthralling, old-fashioned yarn interwoven with a bracing A fresh, impeccable portrait of an era startlingly reminiscent of our own times, Heyday is by turns tragic and funny and sublime, filled with bona fide heroes and lost souls, visionaries Walt Whitman, Charles Darwin, Alexis de Tocqueville and monsters, expanding horizons and narrow escapes. It is also an affecting story of four people passionately chasing their American dreams at a time when America herself was still being dreamed up-an enthralling, old-fashioned yarn interwoven with a bracingly modern novel of ideas.

Jun 10, Tuck rated it liked it Shelves: europa , music-and-others , pre-wwi , sailing-and-fighting , this-ain-t-a-louis-lamour-type-of-p , natural-history , western-rural-with-tractors-horse. Oct 04, Katharine rated it it was amazing.


  1. Skincare startup Heyday raises $8M.
  2. The Culture of Digital Fighting Games: Performance and Practice.
  3. heyday (noun) American English definition and synonyms | Macmillan Dictionary;

I would even go so far as to say it was one of the best I've read this year. I am not usually a historical fiction fan. I would have never picked this book up based on a jacket or a blurb. I did pick it up because I am systematically reading through my public library alphabetically. This book had the good fortune of being written by an author whose last name began with A.

Now, on to the book. This is the saga of four young Americans, three men and one woman, Oh. This is the saga of four young Americans, three men and one woman, Ben, Duff, Skags and Polly, in who symbolize the verve, drive and ingenuity of a fledgling country. As individuals, they are victims of their own economic circumstances yet, none of them choose to remain in what they see as economic bondage.

MOS drivers

They come together to talk a great deal about philosophies and new ideas that are literally and figuratively exploding all around the globe and they decide what to do about it. They each say that they are noble, but they're all selfish like the rest of us, hungry for adventure, invention, revenge, security and Utopia. The author did a fabulous job, in my opinion of drawing such clear characters. I wanted them all to succeed, especially Ben. I loved the way that he, as an English immigrant was enraptured by America and was driven to become one.

I LOVED the language and how the author was so meticulous in making sure that the reader knew that phrases were being invented just as America was, words like "megalopolis" and "ok" were fascinating.

I loved the way that the author had each of the characters rub shoulders sometimes literally with true innovators of that time who didn't know yet that they would all change history. The author was also very honest in his depiction of the darker sides of urban life. My eyes were opened and I felt like I had experienced history in a far more authentic way than I ever had before. I did think that the connection of Ben with Frederick Engels and Skaggs' attempt at an apology to Abraham Lincoln were not needed.

But I didn't roll my eyes because there was a tone of the fantastic to this story -- and I saw it in the beginning when Ben was in Paris fighting off Revolutionaries with a stuffed penguin -- that I was completely drawn to. And the return of Ashby, while far-fetched, was PERFECT What this historical fiction has, that I have rarely seen in other books of this genre, was a spirit of FUN and adventure and lightheartedness and comical coincidences, which some might say were cheap shots by the author.

I don't. I say that as a whole, it worked. If there was a weakness in the book, I would say that the mundane life that Ben and Polly had in San Francisco would be it. Perhaps that also is the point. We can't have adventures all of the time, even that young adult nation in the a story -- the United States -- has to grow up and settle down and be mature at some point. There are some books that I like and I say, "I could have written that. In awe. There's no way I could ever write something so detailed, so full of fun, so complex and leave me with such an intense book hangover afterward.

Jul 02, Marley rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: highly. It could have gone on. The book takes place in that most revolutionary year, , when the great houses of Europe shook and trembled, and in some cases fell--at least for awhile. And in the US gold was discovered. The revolutionary year frames the narrative that takes our heroes from Paris to New York to the Utopian communes of the midwest to San Fransisco and the gold fields--and eventually, their authentic selves.

The strongest characters to me were Timothy Skaggs, daguerreotypist, reporter, womanizer, sometime drunk who turns dreamer stargazer, and philosopher, and Duff Lucking. Polly Lucking, Duff's actressm artustm, avocational prostitute, free thinking sister, and Benjamin Knowles her suitor and second son of a neo-rich British manufacturer and money-grubber round-out the quartet.. And then there is Drumont, who unbeknowst to Knowles, blames him for the death of his brothe in the streets of revolutionary Paris and goes miles to avenge that death.

Heyday by Kurt Andersen

Some reviewers have complained that the main characters did not seem "real" or at least out of place suggesting the book is a revisionist "history. They also complain oddly that there are too many historical details that distract. As an historian with an interest in Republican America, I think the characters were as real as any novelist's creation can be. The historical details were fascinating, not distracting, and made the story seem more real: Blue Mass, whorehosue protocol, fire fighting technology, or lack thereof, Five Points, the yellow press, fashion and interesting midth century vocabhularly.

Sure there are contrivances, but history and fiction are both contrived. The other star of Heydey is technology and how quickly the new becomes old. One night Skaggs tells Ben, "yes even if I don't wish actually to return to the past, I am vexed as the very recent past disappears before my blinkard's eyes. The pull-down-and-build-over again spirit saddens me. One day I counted the demolitions of three-three buildings on Broadway I do not gainsay real progress, he concluded, But I mourn all the victims of progress.

This theme continues throughout Heyday, especially once they hit California and set up their gold camp, Ashbyville, where within little time the four become an anachronism. For some the end of the journey is glad. For others tragic. Duff Lucking's theory of destruction and creation , the cycle of life" permeates the book and serves as a metaphor not only for Skaggs, Knowles, and the Luckiing, but America itself.

Once the dream is caught, it's gone. Feb 15, Marjorie Hakala rated it liked it. I wanted to read something really good, and I'd found this book on a best-of list. I kinda wish I remembered which list it was, so that I could proceed to mistrust that critic's judgment. The writing here isn't bad , and the characters are plausible.

I was really into things for a one or two hundred pages. But there's not a whole lot that's remarkably good about it. I think the writing just needed to be better to justify the scale of this book. Characters keep using words that sound perfectl I wanted to read something really good, and I'd found this book on a best-of list. Characters keep using words that sound perfectly ordinary to twenty-first century readers--"materialism," "star" as a person, etc. This was entertaining exactly once.

By the time I was in the s of the pages and somebody pointlessly remarked, "Output is a strange word. I have never heard it," I was very, very close to putting the book down.

But I'd committed to it thus far, of course, so I finished it, and it kept doing its thing up until the eight hundred whateverth page where it finally decided to stop. There's also the way some dialogue takes place in French or Spanish, and then the author translates everything that was just said. Oh, and every time something in the plot parallels something else in the plot, that's pointed out too. It's just graceless. Three stars for effort, for the interesting facts about 19th-century prostitution, and for being just good enough that I convinced myself I liked it for a while, but I don't especially recommend it.

Mar 05, Carly Thompson rated it liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , arrt , , chunkster. Lord this was a long book that definitely felt like a long book. In many ways this book reminded me of a sprawling Victorian novel like Dickens wrote--lots of characters, lots of detail, humor, romance, and the villain is defeated in the end.

About the Author

In other ways this was clearly a 21st Century novel--more gore, sex, and free thinking attitudes. I liked the book but reading it often felt like a chore. After this he lives on, spending his money and labour and time on unnecessary pleasures quite as much as on necessary ones; but if he be fortunate, and is not too much disordered in his wits, when years have elapsed, and the heyday of passion is over-- supposing that he then re-admits into the city some part of the exiled virtues, and does not wholly give himself up to their successors--in that case he balances his pleasures and lives in a sort of equilibrium, putting the government of himself into the hands of the one which comes first and wins the turn; and when he has had enough of that, then into the hands of another; he despises none of them but encourages them all equally.

If so, my aspect belies me strangely; for--a great weight being off my mind--I feel in the very heyday of my youth, with the world and my best days before me View in context. The natural association of the sentiment of love with the heyday of the blood seems to require that in order to portray it in vivid tints, which every youth and maid should confess to be true to their throbbing experience, one must not be too old. This or this is but outskirt and far-off reflection and echo of the triumph that has passed by and is now at its glancing splendor and heyday , perchance in the neighboring fields, or, if you stand in the field, then in the adjacent woods.

Model Gigi Hadid was seen out and about in New York in a tartan outfit that Les McKeown and the boys might have thought a little over the top in their 70s heyday. Model Gigi is a real Babe City Roller. During Girls Aloud's heyday , I spoke to the band many times.